Painting Stories: Kauffman & Ellison

Kjerstin Anne Kauffman / Ingrid Ellison

 

Painting Stories

 

 

Yaryan’s

My mother surreptitiously turns over peaches,
hiding the green ones, the bruised ones we ransacked,
I and my children, between the warm leaves,
before we can haul them to the scale.

Our plunder blushing in its cardboard crate
(yes, I crave it even now) does fail
to align. Big peaches jostle the small ones,
off-balance, or oddly oblate.

We have to respect the orchard, she’d said,
and she’d meant—suddenly, I understand—
produce culled, cradled, and basking
in ripe uniformity.

A pity we’ve left her to salvaging
what order she can, then bearing, with relative
grace, old Yaryan, who stoops,
weighs, and condescends

to advise: don’t turn up the stems, now.
Maybe we all of us, knowing best, err.
But who’ll forgive us our clumsy possession
of this fruit, these yielded gems?

Beginning Again, Oil on Linen 46×46″, © Ingrid Ellison

Red Roof, Oil on Panel 12×12″, © Ingrid Ellison

 

 

Blue Roof, Oil on Panel 12×12″, © Ingrid Ellison

Buried Under March Snow, Oil on Linen 48×48″, © Ingrid Ellison

Morning in the Cascades

The suburban smells like teenage boys
and coffee. But I’m in the back,
untouchable, serene—
             I’m the queen

of this expedition, who gets to sprawl
with Ebony, the dog, behind
the back seat, on the sleeping-bag-bed
             spread

over rucksacks and ski gear. I get
this envied seat, because when I read
the boys—everybody—listens.
             The roads glisten

with ice. This drive is dangerous. Yet the whole,
parentless carload’s in thrall to Watership Down
though mostly they’re too old
             for it, not bold

enough to admit they like it. I know
it bothers them—maybe it should
that it’s a story about bunnies.
             But it’s funny,

right now, no one wants to stop. We all
want to hear the world, like we thought,
is our enemy. We have to have cunning,
             running

around in it. We have to have tricks.
Maybe they think, these brothers,
and these brothers’ friends, while I read
             they don’t need—

But look. We have such power then. The sun
stands over the mountains. The snow
is everywhere. And my voice, as we are cresting,
             is full, is arresting.

Turning, in Winter

Come inside, winnowing. Two months
this house has been in and out of a fever.
This room has asked me to bend
and whisk away: mucus, peevishness, sorrow.
Now the snow concentrates, heavy, tossing
on window and door. All day
I’ve been brooding the blue-light dispatches
of my phone—is this odd? some mother
had her children whisked by mistake,
by her benevolent state, by god—

The narrowest of passages, the most
impenetrable door I incline to survive as.
Nevertheless, I invite you,
flurry subsumed in this cavern, this room.

Carrying a Story Through the Night, Oil on Linen 48×48″, © Ingrid Ellison

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Ingrid Ellison is a painter working in oil and mixed media. Born in Boston, Ingrid has made Maine her home since 2007. She has exhibited at the CMCA, AVA Center for the Arts, Cynthia Winings Gallery, and Frank Brockman Gallery. Ingrid has a passion for sharing what she does with students both school aged and adult.

Kjerstin Anne Kauffman has taught creative writing at  Johns Hopkins University and Hillsdale College. Her poems, essays, and reviews appear in many periodicals including Literary Matters, Gulf Coast, 32 Poems, The Cresset, Salamander,  and The American Poetry Review.

 

Climbing: Chin & Gaposchkin


Hon. Dr. Jimmy Chin / Jacob Gaposchkin 

 

Climbing

Well isn’t this a bright-eyed looking group!

Thank you for having me here on such a special day, this special moment.  It is a great privilege to speak to you and I have not taken it lightly.  In fact, you might not think someone that has spent the last 20 years climbing in the Himalayas, hanging from high altitude alpine walls and skiing first descents in no fall zones around the world would lose any sleep over speaking to a few college students.  Well, for the record, I’ve spent quite a few nights over the last few months lying in bed sweating it out wondering what in the hell I was going to say to you all.  Breathe Jimmy Breathe!

But today isn’t about me.  It’s about you.  So yes, take a big deep breath…and take it all in.  You’ve worked hard to get here.  And let’s just take a moment to appreciate all the people who have helped you get here, your teachers, your brothers and sister, your friends, your family, and your parents.

sheep, Igloo Mountain

Dall’s Sheep, Igloo Mountain, 2017 ©Jacob Gaposchkin

“But today isn’t about me.  It’s about you.”

 


 

 

mountain passage

Dalton Highway, 2017 ©Jacob Gaposchkin

This moment, graduation from college, is such a beautiful, liberating, and terrifying rite of passage.  For some of you it is the transition to deeper studies in graduate school, and for many, a transition out of the safety net of academia into the “real world.”  That place with a completely bewildering number of options, seemingly impossible choices, pitfalls, opportunities, lack of opportunities, career paths, expectations, Tinder dates…What am I going to do with my Life?

Well, before you panic, which you will if you haven’t already, I have a few things to say.  And please, take whatever I say with a grain of salt.  Some of this will strike a chord with you, and some of it may not, or you may never remember a word I say…but hopefully, hopefully, some of it will become useful down the road.  I am simply here to share a few observations about things I’ve learned from my own personal journey…

The first thing I want to talk about is taking risks.  I know. I know, some of you must be thinking, this is the last guy on the planet that should be giving advice on taking risks…he spends most of his time ridiculously dangerous situations, he almost died in an avalanche!  He’s insane!


Well when I say take risks I don’t mean you should go climb high altitude alpine walls, although it is quite fun, nor am I asking you to make jumps turns down Everest.  So you know, the biggest risk I ever took was forging my own path.  My parents were Chinese immigrants.  They were very traditional and conservative.  For most of my childhood and adolescence, as far as I knew, there were only 4 career paths – doctor, lawyer, professor and investment banker.  My parents were librarians at Minnesota State University.  They saved their whole lives to put me through a private college.  When I finished college, I was under a lot of pressure to pick a traditional career path.  I don’t blame them.  I knew they only wanted the best life possible for me and I appreciated that.  But that path wasn’t me.  I told them I was going to move west and live out of my car and climb and ski full-time.  They were horrified.  They would say things like, “of course, we’re worried. There is no word in Chinese for what you do.”  I would call my sister and ask, “How are mom and dad?” And she would say, “They are a bit worried. They think you’re a homeless person.”  I struggled with a deep sense of doubt and guilt everyday…particularly when, living as a vagabond climbing bum.  I was dumpster diving for food behind grocery stores.  But I continued to fight for the life I wanted.  I lived out of the back of a 1990 Subaru Loyale station wagon.  It wasn’t very glamorous, but I was committed to making a life out of climbing, skiing and living a life of adventure.  It fed something in me and I lived with passion and was surrounded by people who were passionate about what they were doing.
snow covered mountain, range, water

The Alaska Range, Mile 79 Denali Park Road, 2017 ©Jacob Gaposchkin

 



“Being willing to walk away from the expectations of others and of society was the biggest risk I ever took.” 

figure overlooking mountains

Self-portrait, Cathedral Mountain, 2017 ©Jacob Gaposchkin

People often assume I knew what I was doing…that the path was clear to me.  Hell no!  I had no idea what I was doing.  I just knew I wanted meaning and purpose in my life and I set out to find it by following my heart.

And by the way, people always talk about following your heart as if it is easy.  Oh, follow your heart.  Well, sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but it’s not that easy.  It’s not always clear what your heart is telling you.  You have to examine your intentions endlessly.  What are you passionate about?  Who is it you want to be?  What do you want to do?  And most importantly, why?  These are big questions and these are questions I still ask myself every day.  Just know that there is always doubt…that is normal and that is where you have to take the risks to understand yourself and what your heart is telling you…in life and in love.  Being willing to walk away from the expectations of others and of society was the biggest risk I ever took. I cannot overemphasize how important it was for me to have taken that risk.  It was a commitment to that unknown path that eventually led me to one small opportunity and another and another and another that finally brought me to where I am today.  As I was once told, “You have to commit and figure it out.”

The next thing I want to speak about is failure.  Failure is an interesting word.  It has obvious connotations.  However, in my experience, I have learned the most profound lessons in life through failure.


For most of my career, I have been recognized for my successes.  Oh, he skied Everest. He climbed Meru.  Well, what people don’t talk much about are my failures.  And I’ve had many.  When I first looked up at Everest to try and ski it and the first time I gazed up at the icy flanks of Meru, both times, I almost turned around and walked away.  They seemed too big and too outrageous to comprehend.  I was convinced that I would fail.  But I stayed and I tried and I failed spectacularly on both of them.  Through those failures, I learned it was okay to be scared, even good to be scared.  I deconstructed the failures; thought about how I would do things differently; and how I could do them better, move faster and more efficiently.  I learned what I needed to do to come back and eventually ski Everest and to climb Meru.  I not only learned how to better prepare for them, train for them and refine my strategies around climbing them, I also was able to apply what I learned on other mountains.  In essence, those failures gave me the confidence to fail more and in turn to seek bigger goals and objectives in climbing but also in other aspects of my life as well, like in filmmaking.  I learned not to let the big objectives overwhelm me and that just like in climbing big mountains, it’s about the three feet ahead of you, putting one foot in front of the other, keeping the bigger objective in mind, and doing the work right in front of me.  As my mentor, Rick Ridgeway, once said to me while I was starving and feeling hopeless on an expedition where we were attempting an unsupported crossing of the Chang Tang Plateau in Tibet. “You know how you eat an elephant?  One bite at a time.”

northern hawk owl

Northern Hawk Owl, 2017 ©Jacob Gaposchkin


“I truly believe, without compassion, empathy, and respect, there is no ability to have true discourse.”

Denali “The Great One”, Stony Overlook, 2017 ©Jacob Gaposhckin

But back to failure, the great irony is that failure is often the best way forward, the best way to succeed.  And of course, without failure, there is no such thing as success.  And the more you fail, the sweeter the success.  I often think the greatest failure in life could very well be never having failed.  It means you never dared to dream big, never tried something extraordinary, never stuck it out there and never took the risks.  Learn to embrace failure and be proud of failing, because there is such a thing as failing upwards.  Just don’t let failure debilitate you, learn from them, let them motivate you.  Embrace failure and in some ways, you will never fail.  In my life, I have had many failures and I am thankful for every one of them.

Finally, I want to speak about compassion, empathy, and respect.  We live in a time with more forms of communication than any other time in history yet our country and our politics are more divided than ever.  I truly believe, without compassion, empathy, and respect, there is no ability to have true discourse. You will not be able to hear others and in turn, you will not be heard.  Remember, we are all in this together, regardless of color, race, sexual orientation and religion.  We are all trying to make sense of the world, struggling to find meaning and purpose and to get through our own existential crises.


In particular as a graduating class from Unity College, you know, we all lose if we politicize the protection of our environment.  Yes, there are a lot of perspectives on how to protect our environment and yes, you need to take a stand for what you believe in, but you also need to have compassion, empathy, and respect to take down the barbed wire fences between differing opinions and worldview to have real dialogue.  Intelligent dialogue.  Right now we need dialogue that will actually lead to solutions as opposed to deepening the divides.

You are the future and you hold the keys to the preservation and conservation of our environment.  You have the chance to make the world a better place.  To leave it better than you found it.  That is part of your responsibility.

I just saw this African Proverb carved into the wall at the natural museum in New York.  It said, “The Earth is not a gift from our parents. It is a loan from our children.”

How will you use your voice?  How will you use your education to find solutions to the environmental issue we face today?  Frankly put, if you can’t de-politicize the discussion and facilitate intelligent and meaningful discourse about protecting our environment, we’re screwed.

mountains and clouds

Mt. Pendleton & East Fork, 2017 ©Jacob Gaposchkin

 



“Just as you should treat others with respect and compassion, you need to treat yourself with respect and compassion too.”

trees, green Alaska

Tree Line, 2017, ©Jacob Gaposchkin

People will have their opinions and so will you.  Be informed. Examine your opinions carefully but examine the opinions and perspectives of those around you even more carefully.  It is only through understanding the bigger picture that you will be able to form an intelligent opinion.  Have the humility to recognize you might not always be right.

You are graduating today but learning doesn’t end here.  In fact, graduating only means you have now been given the tools to think critically and to continue to learn better.  Life is about learning, about making mistakes and about shifting your gaze, about growing intellectually and growing as a person.  Without compassion, empathy, and respect, you will not be able to truly see the world through different lenses, or place yourself in someone else’s shoes.  And, you will have missed some biggest opportunities to learn and grow.

On that note, compassion also means being compassionate towards yourself.  There is likely no one that is going to be harder on you than you.  Remind yourself to take it easy on yourself.  Just as you should treat others with respect and compassion, you need to treat yourself with respect and compassion too.  We all make mistakes.  Learn from them.  But don’t spend all your time beating yourself up.  You can use that energy in much more productive ways.


In conclusion, I encourage you to think big when you go forward becoming the person you want to be.  The one great privilege you have is the privilege of creating a meaningful life for yourself.  And when I say a meaningful life, don’t sell yourself short.  Go big!  Never stop reminding yourself that every day that passes is one less day you have to live, so get out there, take risks, fail spectacularly, be compassionate, empathetic, respectful, be patient with yourself, put one foot in front of the other, create the life you dream of and become the person you want to be.  You have no one to do it for you but yourself.

Thank you.

Dr. Jimmy Chin

 “The one great privilege you have is the privilege of creating a meaningful life for yourself.”

northern lights

Aurora, Northern Boreal Forest, 2017 ©Jacob Gaposchkin

 

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Hon, Dr. Jimmy Chin is an image-maker, filmmaker, and athlete specializing in mountain sports. He was Unity College’s 2017 Commencement speaker.

Jacob Gaposchkin is a recent graduate of Unity College’s Wildlife & Fisheries Management program. After graduating in May, Jake hopped in his truck and made a beeline for Alaska for his third consecutive summer in the state. Jake returned to Denali National Park and Preserve for his second summer working as a wildlife technician for the National Park Service. Jake works with all wildlife in the park but his primary focus is grizzly bears; specifically managing their interactions with humans. “It is an incredible opportunity to learn a lot about about the wilderness and a lot about myself”, says Jake. The job is a unique chance to work on both sides of wildlife management issues and learn about the crucial balance between humans and wildlife.

Jake is a dedicated outdoorsman with a passion for photography; making the most of all that Alaska has to offer. To Jake, there is no one specific thing that draws him to Alaska, it is how everything comes together to make it such an extraordinary place. In Alaska, every day is different and every day Jake is set back by the unparalleled and anomalous beauty of the state. He always brings a camera with him to try and capture these moments so they can be enjoyed and experienced by others.

 

 

 

 

Batrachomancy: Wagenaar and Kydd

 

Chelsea Wagenaar / Sal Taylor Kydd

 

chidren holding polywags

Pollywogs, 2016, ©Sal Taylor Kydd

 


Batrachomancy
—divination by frogs

Somewhere they leap on soft wet banks,
crouch in clear waters, their mottled skin
as dew brilliant as the spiderwebs were the spring
my father saved them. They don’t know how
they were spared, of course, the wrist-thin skin
of their throats pale and pulsing to sound out
the hours, each other. Perhaps only a few
still survive that spring twelve years ago,
when their mother trekked up from the wooded stream
that bordered our yard and emptied her belly
in our swimming pool—nebulous cluster
of milky globules suspended there, each an eye
with its black, pinpricked center. There,
to our spellbound disgust, they hatched—
the pool a frantic bevy of heads and tails,
the luck or curse that placed them there.
If I follow them back through their afterlives,
bellowing and skin-darkened to herald
a coming rain, voluble with warning
when storms approached, some lost,
perhaps tweezed apart in junior high labs,
or caught again by my father, cupped too tightly
in the hands of his new daughter—if I follow them
back through their chorused, forested lives,
I can trace them up the garden hose
that poured them in synchronized frenzy
into their rightful waters, the hose
a sinuous lifeline climbing the yard to our pool,
where its other end siphoned the tadpoles
from a water thrilled with their darting chaos.
Look harder, farther: I see my father
by the stream, kneeling in damp clay,
his lungs full, his mouth around the hose
inhaling a deep, slow gasp, then another,
until the summoned water met his mouth.
The bodies pouring out into the life
they had not known to imagine.
And his watching them arrowed away
in the current like undoused green flames.
And the bitter, secret taste on his tongue.
young girl backbend

Backbend, 2015, ©Sal Taylor Kydd

plant floating in water

Flotsam, 2015, ©Sal Taylor Kydd

 

 

 


child legs under water swimming

Elliot Diving, 2015, ©Sal Taylor Kydd

edge of still water with tree line reflection

Linda’s Cove, 2015, ©Sal Taylor Kydd

swimming girl head out of water

Lola Rising, 2015, ©Sal Taylor Kydd

Lullaby in a Drought

In the drawers, in the cabinets,
we find pecan casings and pellets,

the answer to the question
of what patters in the walls at night.

We are not the only lovers here.
If the lights go out, we used to say,

you pour the wine and I’ll find
the matches. But we dare not tempt them

in this tinder town—where sycamores shed
parched unready leaves, where yards are fringed

with thistle barbs. If the waters rise,
we used to say, you pour the wine

and I’ll tear out the best pages.
But now the baby’s in her seventh week,

pulled from the secret waters
of my body into a rainless topography.

Who is more sorry?
She sleeps the sleep of rivers.

In the nights I sit cradleside when she wakes,
humming Brahms’ famous notes—

a song he wrote to sway an old love.
So we are always singing

what we cannot change.
The walls fill with patter, rain clouds

form somewhere else. The wine
grows older, finer. If the funnel forms,

if the hail falls.


The Gospel According to the Ant

You unbeautiful unwelcome creature,
spring-herald, anti-chef,
I find you

mired in malbec spatter,
freckling the sugar bowl,

a moving pixel among the strawberry’s
seed-pocked flesh.

Little needle threaded
with these traces of my life,
you sew me

to the whirring world underfoot.
In perfect sync with the 5 o’clock train’s
westward heave,

you bear your crumb freight—
a piece of rind nearly twice your tercet body—

with what I have no word for
except maybe grace. Grace

that stays my hand, grace
that doesn’t lessen your load

but lets you carry it
until you reach your pocket of earth

where the others rise, finally,
to help you set it down.

 

dead goldfinch

The Goldfinch, 2015, ©Sal Taylor Kydd

girl in old-fashioned farm watering station

Girl Bathing, 2015, ©Sal Taylor Kydd

 

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from in a single hand emerging from water

A Frog in the Hand, 2015, ©Sal Taylor Kydd

Sal Taylor Kydd writes of her photographs from OriginsMy work is primarily an exploration of memory, how we preserve memories and how they shape our lives moving forward with sometimes illusory certainty.  It is also a reflection on time, and an examination of the fleeting moments where we behold change within ourselves and the world around us. I see the photographic object is a keepsake of our experience, and as such is a way of recording discoveries that serves as a reminder of what we have lost and what we are attempting to preserve.

In my most recent work I have been looking at how memory shapes and distorts our understanding of what is real.  Specifically it is an exploration of truth through the lens of our relationships – how what we know to be certain about ourselves and the other, changes in the course of that journey. What do we keep for ourselves and what do we share? In a world where everything is shared and exposed, what is left that is sacred. 


Chelsea Wagenaar is the author of Mercy Spurs the Bone, selected by Philip Levine as the winner of the 2013 Philip Levine Prize.  She holds a BA from the University of Virginia and a PhD from University of North Texas. Her work appears recently or is forthcoming in The Southern Review, The Normal School, and Poetry Northwest.  She currently lives in Indiana, where she is a postdoctoral Lilly Fellow at Valparaiso University.

Artist Sal Taylor Kydd has a BA in Modern Languages and an MFA in Photography from Maine Media College.  She has exhibited nationally, with shows at A. Smith Gallery in Texas, Gallery 69 in LA, and Pho Pa Gallery in Portland ME. Sal is also a book-artist represented by Priscilla Juvelis, Inc.  She resides in Rockport, Maine.

McAvoy: Shannon Rankin ~ Where the Dragons Lie

Suzette McAvoy


Shannon Rankin: Where the Dragons Lie

 

“It is not down on any map; true places never are.” ~ Heman Melville

Maps are flat; the earth is round. This essential conundrum has bedeviled mapmakers since Ptolemy. How to wrestle the complexities of the three-dimensional world to the two-dimensional mat of the map? Mercator gave a valiant try and his cylindrical projection has withstood the test of time despite vast distortions of landmasses at the poles because a line drawn on his map is a true direction. Charting a course, plotting a line, voyaging from point A to B, sailors traverse the world. Goods move, people travel, knowledge expands; the world grows larger, then contracts, at once vast and infinitesimal.

Where are we? How do we get there? Is there another way?

Questioning the existential to arrive at the concrete, confronting the abstract to embrace the dimensional, we map it out—in life as in art.

Shannon Rankin (b.1971) is an artist who uses the language of maps to explore the complexities and interconnections between the inner and outer worlds, between that which is known and that which remains beyond the field of knowledge, that mythical place on medieval maps where the dragons lie and cherubs blow the wind. The duality of our human capacity for imagination and reason, for creation and destruction, for being of nature and apart from it, is a rhumb line that courses through her work.

 


 

©Shannon Rankin, Synapse



Using maps as both material and metaphor, Rankin creates installations, collages and sculptures that play on the parallels and connections found among geological and biological processes, patterns in nature, geometry and anatomy. For instance, Synapse | Diptych, a relatively large two-part piece from 2011, presents a flat circle composed of a web of delicately cut-out red roadways connecting variously shaped bright yellow population centers, the whole sliced down the center to create symmetrically sized halves, the same yet different. The right half has a wide blue river snaking through it, the left has a pronounced branching highway. The title and the divided composition make apparent the analogy to the human nervous system and the cerebral hemispheres—the right and left-brain. Another more macro reading suggests a satellite image of the Earth at night, with the bright lights of city centers illuminated and connected by the electrical grid.


“Maps,” says Rankin, “are everyday metaphors that speak to the fragile and transitory state of our lives and our surroundings. Rivers shift their course, glaciers melt, volcanoes erupt; boundaries change both physically and politically. The only constant is change.”

Course, another work from 2011, takes the form of a meandering soft blue line created from cut and folded polar maps. Presented vertically on the wall, it flows circuitously downward, its accordion pleats compressing glacial time, slowing but not halting the implied melting.

A recent series of collages, Compression 1, 2 and 3, 2016, picks up a similar theme. All are made from reassembled nautical charts of the arctic, sharply cut, sometimes overdrawn in graphite, the multi-layered triangular forms shift under and over each other, referencing the process of the warming and cooling of the polar ice sheets. That they are somberly toned in shades of grey, white and black reinforces their elegiac quality.

©Shannon Rankin, Compression 1

©Shannon Rankin, Compression 3


©Shannon Rankin, Plate 1

©Shannon Rankin, Plate 2

Plate 1 and Plate 2, are two other recent works by Rankin that continue the theme of environmental harm. Plate 1 is made from ink and graphite on collaged ocean maps and is one of her most abstract and solemn works. A mere 7 x 7 inches, its impact is larger than its scale. The heavily wrinkled and abraded surface is entirely covered in graphite and black ink, producing a sheen and density akin to an oil slick, a mourning veil for a dying planet. Plate 2 is larger at 16 ¼ x 16 ¼ inches and the underlying geometric grid of the collaged map squares is visible beneath a deep sea-blue. The surface of work is a web of lines and texture, suggesting a net afloat in a turgid sea. Taken together, Plate 1 and Plate 2 are a powerful testament to the Earth’s fragility and its endurance. Can we rescue it from ourselves?

Time as a metaphor and a component of making is embedded in Rankin’s art. Her processes of creation and methods of installation are slow and meditative, involving careful painstaking cutting, the accumulation of many small repeated forms, and the meticulous pinning, stitching or pasting of pieces to form a whole. Sometimes an idea or method is revisited or is carried further in a series, but every work is unique and individual, every installation new to its time and place.


A comparison of Artifacts 1 and Artifacts 2, for example, is instructive for the changes that appear in the four-year interval between their makings. Artifacts, 2011, is made from water-soaked map fragments, torn and adhered to paper measuring 44 x 30 inches. Artifacts 2, 2015, is the same dimensions but presented horizontally. In this later work, the scattered shards of paper are undercoated by hot red orange acrylic, visible along their curled edges. The implications are clear, the world has turned a corner, the Earth is heating up, we are scattering our ashes.

Originally from California’s San Joaquin Valley, Rankin moved to Maine to attend the Maine College of Art in Portland, where she received a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts degree in 1997. A stint working in graphic design in San Francisco, where the work was almost entirely computer based, led her back to Maine to take a job as a pattern cutter for a fashion designer so she could again work with her hands. It was this experience that gave rise to the cutting and sewing techniques that she uses in her art.

©Shannon Rankin, Artifacts 1

©Shannon Rankin, Artifacts 2 (detail)


©Shannon Rankin, Falls, 2010

©Shannon Rankin, detail Falls, 2010

“I intricately cut, score, wrinkle, layer, fold, paint and pin maps to produce revised versions that often become more like the terrains they represent,” she says. A case in point is Falls, 2010, an installation created for the Center for Maine Contemporary Art Biennial (which won the Juror’s Prize), composed of hundreds of thin strips of maps, all cut to identical size and pinned in small bunches to the wall, forming the shape of a gently curved isosceles triangle. Each bundled tuft of cut strips bends downward in a graceful pour, taken as a whole they suggest a waterfall. In presenting Rankin with the Biennial award, juror Dennis Pinette writes, “She constructs a convincing deeply playful logic based on a formal understanding of pattern and geometry. Beyond the formal, her instincts propel her art to that rare zone of originality were unique abstract language is clearly defined.”

Rankin now lives in Rangley, in western Maine’s lake district, surrounded by mountains. When asked recently by an interviewer, “Who is your role model or mentor (alive or dead)? She responded, “Does nature count?”


Lately Rankin has been consciously pushing herself to work outside her comfort zone, challenging herself to making art that is “nebulous, amorphous, ambiguous.” Since April 2016, she has been in Roswell, New Mexico, participating in the yearlong Roswell Artist-In-Residence Program. This “gift of time” has allowed her to take risks and experiment with new materials and methods of working, as well as to respond to a landscape vastly different than Maine.

“For a while now,” she says, “I have worked in a way that has been very controlled and precise. Often the compositions are based on underlying patterns or grids. That hasn’t changed for every series, but I am attempting to shake things up a bit more. Let go of some control. Explore chaos, the unplanned and mysterious.”

Earth Embroideries is a series she began before she left for New Mexico and has continued there, the work is becoming more abstract and more macro in viewpoint with each iteration.

©Shannon Rankin, Earth Embroidery (Drift)

©Shannon Rankin, Earth Embroidery (Glitch 1)


 

©Shannon Rankin, Unearthed 8

©Shannon Rankin, Unearthed 10

They are an obvious departure from her earlier work in that they are not created from the physical material of maps, instead she is distilling satellite views of the artic into minimal line drawings created in thread on paper. She says, “I’m transcribing a vast amount of physical space into something I can hold and stitch by hand. In some of these I am also incorporating digital glitches which are visible when zooming in on Google Earth.” In a very real sense, the Earth Embroideries are about mending the world.

Unearthed, is another new series Rankin is exploring in Roswell. Inspired by the soil, sediment, light and texture of the New Mexican landscape, these richly patterned works are composed of cut and collaged maps hand-colored in jewel tones, mossy greens, and earthy browns. The compositions are loosely rectangular shapes with open irregular edges; they are her most painterly works to date. “I’ve always had this fantasy of being a painter,” she says, “but I’ve never really loved using paint. Instead, I’m using topographic maps, ink and pigmented graphite.” Haunting in their abstract beauty, the Unearthed collages collectively sound a Greek chorus to our frayed yet lovely planet.


In her most recent work, Rankin moves beyond the known into uncharted territory. She has been experimenting with creating landscapes out of soil, casting them in plaster, then using them to create press molds for ceramic forms that resemble fossils, moonscapes, or the surface of other planetary bodies. “I’m trying to squeeze, combine, merge and overlap the macro and micro,” she says. “I’m always looking in and looking out.”

A map is not the size of the earth its describes. Scale must be determined, as well as which features to include and which to leave out. You can’t include every tree in the forest; generalizations have to be made. Artists are familiar with these considerations and choices. A work of art is not the thing it describes, but something other.

“To put a city in a book, to put the world on one sheet of paper—maps are the most condensed humanized spaces of all,” writes Robert Harbison in his book Eccentric Spaces. “…they make the landscape fit indoors, make us masters of sights we can’t see and spaces we can’t cover.” Likewise with art.

©Shannon Rankin, Unearthed 7

 

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Suzette McAvoy has served as director and chief curator of the Center for Maine Contemporary Art since September 2010. She previously served as chief curator of the Farnsworth Art Museum and has lectured and written extensively on the art and artists of Maine. McAvoy received a B.A. in Art History from Hobart & William Smith Colleges and an M.A. in Museum Studies from the Cooperstown Graduate Program. She lives in Belfast.

You can view more of Shannon Rankin’s work via her website.

In The Southwest: Keane & Fogel

Kristin Keane Harris Fogel

Caught

I.

I am not sure who made the Grand Canyon so wild—it is hot, petrified, ready to bake you alive. In summer, the air strangulates, suffocates, smothers. The way it takes you by the neck, you must dip your entire face—your whole body, even—into the Colorado River for relief, the residue evaporating from your skin as quickly as air releases from a punctured balloon. Dehydration comes regularly and the canyon takes lives that way. Sixty-five to be exact, lifeless and seized on the switchbacks off the rim. Some come for the beauty, but usually it is for the risk.

Once a man waited out the heat by resting, foregoing the hike down towards the river because of fatigue. When his friends returned, they found him dead. I would like to ask that man: Were his last moments with the canyon as intimate as two hands pressing together? Did he see inside himself? Was there a choice?

dessert landscape

Backyard, Pioneertown, California, c. 1999 – 2003 ©Harris Fogel


II.

Lately I’ve been thinking about the Grand Canyon because deep in the gorge I fell into a rapid and the river and I had a moment with one another. I traveled with an outfitter one hundred twenty-six miles in, two billion years of geological history and layer upon layer of eroded rock, a deep gash inside the Earth’s crust. A silty river, colored like chocolate milk rests below the rim, one hundred twelve rapids dotting the surface, shifting and changing every moment; it does not die. The crests of them are entirely whitewater, turbulent and frothy. Formed by holes, formed by heavy, collapsed things; formed by blockages; formed by waves themselves—breaking white-capped haystacks. They are not all the same of course, and a guideline indicates their power by numbers one through ten. We went there to ride across them, hang on for dear life and fly through them, the river guides cowboys armed with wooden-oared reins. The danger was the draw: it made us feel more alive.

The water, remarkably, is not the only peril inside the canyon. Dust storms take you by the throat and during monsoon season, the way the river sweeps into the craggy channels between the rocks, you can get pinned against a boulder and drown. That’s not to mention others: sunburns so intense the layers of your flesh become as powdered as a cigarette sleeve’s ash. The winter temperatures drop so far below zero, the frigid water can freeze your extremities so they snap off the way you break a candy bar in half. Sheer cliff edge’s hairpin turns and rattlesnake bites, the thorny ends of catclaw acacia brushing against your bare legs, poisonous scorpions, the bulls’-eye shaped targets of mayfly bites, left for other animals to sink their stingers inside. It goes on.

When we arrived at Lava Falls, one of the most technically difficult American rapids, the guide turned and said right before the drop, “You really don’t want to go over, so grasp the raft tightly,” after I asked what we should do in case of emergencies, in case the whole plan fell apart down there. In fact I asked this just moments before we got slammed, before the raft lifted up and licked the sky one last time and we hit the wave train in a way that we might as well have been striking the stony surface of the canyon wall. She had also said, “Just make sure you have thirty seconds of air in your lungs,” and something else about not getting caught on anything.

But thirty seconds is a big stretch, after all. It is enough time to forget why you’re there, to make a terrible choice, yield to something. When I saw the guide fumble the oar as the rapid approached, bending down towards us high and glossy in the arch of a snakes’ tongue, I thought: that’s really beautiful; and then: it’s over.


III.

The rapid. Days of getting beaten down by swells of water, pummeled at the edges of the rafts’ frames, made it hard to tell we had flipped, but then I felt my feet looking for a place to anchor themselves where the foot straps should have been. I opened my eyes under water and saw the detritus the canyon spit out floating around inside, brown as a nut. It was quiet under there. I was quiet under there, twisting around the places where the water’s velocity shifted me. I realized I couldn’t really hear the rapid because it is thing you feel, even after breath has been knocked clean out of you, even when your ears are wide open. My heart met the rapid’s heart, they fastened, and we slid down a drain together.

It was a bludgeoning like a baton to the right cheekbone with the rush and force of two magnets’ poles: a tethering that could not be undone. Days could have passed under there, who knows? We compared notes. Bodies: my extremities to its jagged, pencil-thin twigs; the mosaic of its bedrock to the freckled constellations of my shoulders. We have both dreamt of butterflies. In mine their crab-shaped bodies fluttered inside my grandmother’s antique jewelry box; in the rapid’s, their wings were made from weighty arrowweed, sinking them in the river just as soon as they pitched themselves into the sky. The rapid lined my regrets and secrets up like smooth river rocks and held my face up to each buried one: I’ve toiled too long in places I should have left sooner, spent too much time in worry. I hide from myself. It is hard to weep in water, but right then I found a way. You might not believe me, but the rapid shifted shape and showed me myself.

I paused trying to recall what Betsy had said right before the drop. (Be careful not to get caught up, or be careful not to get caught on, anything?) The rapid and I agreed this was a moment when time appeared to fold in on itself.


IV.

I don’t know how I came up, or where. I remember immediately trying to commit to memory the things felt inside: arousal, pulling my heart from inside of its heart. I turned back from the rescue raft and suddenly it was gone. The waves barked up from the other side, and considering the mess of the current, there was no going back. You might tell me that a wave never dies, but it also never doesn’t.

dessert landscape

Cholla Study No. 2, Joshua Tree, California, c. 1998 ©Harris Fogel


V.

The last night on the river, a guide is struck by lightening. Chasing pineapple upside-down cake with thimbles of bourbon, we sang “Happy Birthday” while fingers of electrostatic zipped across the canyon’s edge.

“Lightening rarely comes off the rim, so we’re fine,” someone actually said right before a bolt hit the umbrella we stood under to keep dry. The passenger we were singing to still held a plate of cake in his hand, seven candles stuck into the slice, one for each decade. At first I thought the struck guide was gazing at the lightening from his back like he was watching clouds form—unicorn, bear, ice-cream-cone-riding-turtle. I was reminded of the rapid, how it could reshape itself into anything. But then someone said, Is Jim dead?, just like that. A few of us stepped towards him. He was blue as a starling egg, but breathing.

Yucca Valley landscape

After the Fires, Pioneertown Road, Yucca Valley, California, c. 1999 – 2003 ©Harris Fogel


VI.

I went there to bake under the sun, contort myself up rope ladders, travel into something famously perilous. I went there not to be remembered of death but to push against it, to ride the river’s wild edge and feel more alive. The awakening was supposed to be in the risk of the rapid, not in falling for it: it lives unapologetically, moves the way the stars and shifts of the moon’s gravity go, careens and turns and bends for itself because what makes it up is everything else—it is the rapid, but it is the river, the dirt, the rocks—living by its own accord, unafraid and unapologetic of what’s next. We see danger in the way that light flashes against a rapid’s foamy ridges, and the rapid just sees the light.

Nine Mile Canyon landscape

Nine Mile Canyon, Above Owens Valley, Inyokern, California, c. c. 1999 – 2003 ©Harris Fogel


VII.

I could have done things differently down there. I could have reached harder for a handhold, pinched the tips of my fingers between a slot in the rock bed’s surface, wedged my feet inside a gap, bowed my head to exhale. I could have punished myself, ended things. I could have caught razorback suckers with my bare hands, ripped their heads clean off with my teeth. Under is where fear finally stops. Under is an uncomplicated surrender. Under is a good place to hide. The guide got struck by lightening that night, and he went back the very next summer. I wanted to ask him what he experienced inside that streak of electricity, how he felt underneath the pulse. I didn’t get the chance to, but I’m guessing I probably already know. If the opposite of cheating death is dying, then what do you call the place in between?


VIII.

Somewhere along the way we learn fear, we worry for what’s coming next, relinquish ourselves to control, to loss of pure unrestraint. Then we hide from ourselves. I’m no good at learning from the past, but I know now there is a place under that rapid more powerful than the roar of the water ricocheting between the canyon walls, a place where you can go get caught. A rapid doesn’t drown anyone: it lives primal and intrepid, unafraid of broken bridges.

Here’s a trick I’ve found to feel more alive that is not in dodging rattlesnakes, their forked, smelling tongues: I imagine heading for the edge of the vertical drop, but do not ask what will happen next. I see the rapid ahead, prettily misshapen and speeding towards me. I do not sink my feet into the footholds of the raft; I do not grip the straps so tightly my knuckles go white. Instead I let go, press my hands together. I think about time, butterflies, drain holes. I pull my fingers apart and set the palm of my hand against the place on my chest where my heart is under. I listen. I wait for time to fold.

De Anza Cycle Park landscape

On the Road to De Anza Cycle Park, I-60 east of Moreno Valley Near Banning Pass, Riverside County, California, c. 1999 – 2003 ©Harris Fogel

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Kristin Keane lives in the Bay Area where she teaches at the University of San Francisco. A Vermont Studio Center writing resident and LitCamp juror, her fiction has been shortlisted for a Glimmer Train prize in fiction and has appeared or is forthcoming in SmokeLong Quarterly and Fjords Review. 

Harris FogelThese photographs were made using an 8×10-inch Deardorff view camera; for most of the images the camera was fitted with a Fuji 250mm F6.8 lens. The original book maquette of a Few American Cultures was created in 1993 at the request of the late Reinhold Misselbeck, then curator of the Museum Ludwig in Köln. Housed in a black plastic negative binder, it was filled with one-of-a-kind Cibachrome 8×10-inch contact prints printed on the glossy print material when I lived in Palm Springs, California. The advent of digital imaging allowed me to revisit the work and reconsider it in a larger framework.

The project began in the 1980s, with several themes; water politics in the West centered in California, the western landscape, portraiture, the South, etc., all cultures unique to themselves, but overlapping at the same time. I have continued to work on the project, creating new images, evolving and expanding. The shift to the 8×10-inch view camera not only slowed me down, but it allowed an exploration and description of texture instead the rough jottings of texture that smaller formats provided.

Kaya Pulz: Home

 

Kaya Pulz

 

Home

 

I throw open the creaky front door of my light yellow Victorian house. My bare feet leap down from my porch, covered with cracked white paint and sandy shoes. I look across the street to the dry field as my eyes follow the lime green frisbee that some middle-aged locals are tossing. I catch myself giggling as one of the men runs towards the wooden gazebo, yelling at the other player because she threw it too hard. My eyes glance passed the mixture of aged houses and newly built mansions, while I feel a sense of adrenaline every time I place my foot over a small pebble. The early autumn sky beats down on the small winding tree at the end of the road that I once thought of as a jungle gym. Then I stop, trying to work up enough energy to run across the steaming black road between the two beachside inns to get to my destination.

It’s off season here in Beach Haven, New Jersey. I hear no voices of humans, but faint screeches of seagulls and crashes of shoreline waves. I step through the fields of white sand and broken shells, as if I were sneaking past a sleeping lion, until I reach the end of the dry border of the ocean-kissed floor. While I watch the white ocean foam inflate and deflate from the rough wind, my feet descend into the soft, muddy ground as if I were trapped in this place of pastel blues and misty skies. I can smell nothing but salty seaweed and a slight touch of grilled chicken from the beachside houses. The warm feeling of the sunrays grabbing my bare arms is astonishingly comforting. The beach has always been my go-to.


For holidays, mostly Christmas, everyone on my father’s side, including distant relatives, would join together and celebrate on this beach. After the Christmas feast everyone would hurry to the frigid shore in our sweater dresses and ironed suits. Some would run into the ocean searching for sea glass, while others conversed about the poor horseshoe crab they found washed up on the sand, or maybe about what unimaginable desserts awaited us in the kitchen. With each gust of wind pushing past our ears, it was as if the beach were trying to spark up a conversation too. Maybe about how rough the summer was, or about how happy it is that we were all back again.
On the rare occasion that we would get a snow storm, I would be at the beach all day. I remember my father pulling my bright pink winter hat over my eyes because we were in such a rush to get started. As we ran out of the front door with our multicolored disk sleds wearing snow suits that resembled giant marshmallows, we would try our hardest not to slip to our deaths. The winter wind on the shoreline made me livid, but sliding down the frozen dunes face first was worth the frost-tipped nose on my face. Being so small at the time, I was drawn to the conclusion that I was sliding down mountains. As we descended for what felt like an hour, I would scream a scream that could shatter glass. Thankfully it never snowed too often, but when it did you would know where to find me.

Although the beach was an exhilarating place to be, it was also a place for me to run to when life was not the most enjoyable. Sometimes I would leave a note, sometimes I wouldn’t, but when my father knew I was upset he always knew where I was. I remember a time stumbling out of my house in tears, knowing nothing but the fact that I needed to be on the beach. I didn’t even care about stepping on all of the small pebbles. It was mid-Spring, which meant there may have been another person or two soaking up the sun and enjoying the cool water. I saw someone, but I could not let them intrude on my alone time in the place that taught me stability and restored my sanity.
As I sit here in the warm, dusty sand reminiscing about all the times I have had on this beach, a small sandpiper scurries across my view. As I start to stand again, the lightly colored, miniature bird soars across the ocean. I begin to wonder where it might be going or when it will land again. I continue to make my way to the mussel-covered jetties that my mother always warned me about, mostly because she thought I would slip on the mossy seaweed. As I stroll, I catch a strange movement out of the corner of my eye. I think it’s a wave, but as soon as I turn my head I see a silky grey fin arise from the rugged waters. I decide not to walk any further, but to imbibe the beauty of the local dolphins. Each one submerges in sync with the others. I watch the sun begin to set, as the vivid colors of pink and orange fill


the sky. The dolphins begin to swim away from shallow waters, and my view is like a Bob Ross painting. I look down at my sandy toes and find a full, palm-sized sand dollar inches away from my footprint. Each design amazes me. Every
moment that I spend here, I am amazed by something new. I realize that this place pulls me in as if I were part of the tides. My father calls me to come home soon, but I am already home.

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Kaya Pulz is a 19 year old student from Beach Haven, NJ currently enrolled in Unity College as a Sustainable Agriculture major. She plans to run a small-scale organic farm and further her studies in soils sciences. Her ultimate goal is to encourage sustainable practices and healthy living, so that everyone has the chance to experience the beauties of the world. ​

Dwelling: Menting & Carpenter

Stephanie Wade
Introduction


It is so easy to get lost in our hurry to get there- time dissolves as we browse the internet; as we speed from place to place, ingesting soundbites and tweets, directed to the fastest route possible by Google’s algorithms, by the voices from our phones.  But, what, ultimately, do we lose in our quest for efficiency?

Poems slow us down and open us up by creating space in which we can navigate and renegotiate the terrain of our lives, explore the intersections between self and other, and imagine new worlds. Dwelling in poetry changes our bearings. Maps do the same thing. They create layers of time and place; they allow us to imagine multiple paths, alternative destinations, new worlds. Illustrating geography, history, politics, and culture, maps, like poems, serve as portals, like the map songs Harriet Tubman and others used to connect stars in the sky and moss on trees and people on the path to freedom.

Michelle Menting’s poetry and Margot Carpenter’s maps invite consideration of the consequences of haste, and they illustrate alternatives. Their work reminds us that many paths lie ahead, twisting and turning and intersecting and diverging, appearing and disappearing, again and again. Slowing down, dwelling in their work, we may feel the connections between humans and other mammals, consider the shared spaces we inhabit, and learn where to find what nourishes us.


Harriet, ©Margot Carpenter

 

AFTER READING “A BLESSING” BY JAMES WRIGHT

I pay more attention to life
along the highway. Literal life. Literal
highway. So often I’m consumed
by the death, the road-kill-carrion
smeared muscle of rodents, raccoons,
even bears. Oh my.
Before A Blessing, I noticed not
the Guernsey cows, so golden, so sweet,
and the deer that make it, that do
their best Baryshnikov over the ditch.
I noticed instead the porcupine’s needles
follicle-ing from asphalt pores, the fox’s tail
bobbing and stuck in a seam of tar,
and the feral cats who didn’t do their best
Martha Graham to avoid a Honda’s tire.
After A Blessing and learning about breaking
into flower, and the joy experienced
from observing two ponies nuzzling,
I pay attention. I see turtles living on the edge,
scooping the gravel to lay their eggs.
And my left arm greens to a stem.
I see frogs being improper in the road, right
in the middle of the road during a rain storm,
and I brush pollen from my shirt.
Those cows, those gentle Guernseys?
I see them, and the fingers on my right hand
become petals. I can’t step out of

my body completely and break
into flower, but parts do blossom.
After reading A Blessing I’m still no fool.
I can’t ignore the sadness of the road,
the literal road, the metaphorical one too.
One morning while running in Madison,
Wisconsin, I saw further up the street
the shape of a squirrel hovering over
some thing, some still but soft thing.
I caught up and the squirrel, that visible
squirrel, didn’t flee. It didn’t leave
its partner, the soft lump in the center
of the road, clearly hit, clearly dead.
This squirrel, this living rodent, this pest
to attics and garages, prodded its dead love.
Nudged her. Wouldn’t leave when I ran by,
and only fled to the grove of oaks
when another truck approached.
I kept running. I looked back,
and that squirrel had returned
to its partner’s side. That’s when I thought
I’d break. That my whole body and heart
would break, but not into blossom.
Instead, I would crumble like a leaf
in November. I would crisp into pieces—
some parts dirt, while others
would sparrow into the wind.

Hills to Sea Trail, ©Margot Carpenter

CYCLIC

The odor was septic and made us speechless,
though we’d already lost our voices
when the sun napped dusk, when night’s sheet
hushed the traffic, the birds, our thoughts.
It was a peahen hit to the ditch
and decaying. Her left wing shielded
her breast–a draped cape, her final
comfort. The smell of turkey is not
always the same. If we cooked her carcass,
would the scent remind us of arugula,
of berries brined? Of autumn and wood fires,
or late summer’s chilled wine? This find,
this bird, we encountered on an evening
that made us question beauty, was she messaging
her last will and flight? Her lofted feathers,
those still sticking to live twigs weighted
with winter berries, lead us further still
into the meadow policed by the farmer’s
one black horse and one banded cow.
Land we did not own but that owned
our souls in its soil like all life its surface
sends meandering. Not listless in loss
but lustful for fresh discovery in beauty
found in failed crossings, we crossed
as wayfarers. We foraged through paths
in pastures of sorghum futures or would-be whey.
Our earlobes and nostrils, every follicle
of skin, set as seismographs collecting
fall rot and cyclic decay–any fresh
disturbance–in measurements of awe.

Hills to Sea Trail,  ©Margot Carpenter

HOW, NOW FROM OUR FRONT DOORWAY YOU CAN SEE A FAIRWAY

Maybe the moon rises like this everywhere?
Wide, reflecting the pond in the middle
of a golf course? We laughed: how
coarse, a course of golf. How now
we went from a home in the woods
to puddle and turf. Now,
we look from a gate with wire
that wraps the remaining pines: how, now
they fence the land. Still, that moon,
once buck now harvest, is slow
but full over the tree line. Low
and looming. Too orange to be safe.  

Washington County Farmer’s Market, Margot Carpenter for Maine Federation of Farmer’s Markets

REVISION

This time in my house, I’ll bring in the furniture, inside
this time, from the garage.

Years ago, our house–the one we lived in together, thought
how cool to be new in our twenties with a deed and a driveway,

that house, a brick bungalow with charm–stayed empty
for a year with bags as dressers, futon for our bed.

That house–hollow without tables or chairs, sofa or stools–
we didn’t know how to fill, except with our voices: inside

the air between rafters and thresholds, all that space, we’d loft
phrases, pastoral and poetic. You’d say lines

like, you shed our morning blankets like a dragonfly
molting, and I’d say, you’re wading along the lakeshore,

wielding a net. And back and forth, the words we tossed
echoed and faded, bounced in that space we shared

against emptiness. Maybe if we had created an alcove,
spackled a wall, constructed a partition, or just brought in

our furniture, we could have secured our words, trapped them
inside, filled our house like an aquarium of language.

Instead, after coffee that final August morning–our last
together in that house or anywhere, with windows

open, breeze traveling through–we sat in silence.
The only words were stuck on the refrigerator door.

In block letters we formed phrases, final and magnetic.
You linked: SHADOWS WE FELL THROUGH

TRUTHS WE LOST. And I linked: I KNOW
AND MISS A HOUSE A HOME.

And all around us, inside and quiet, the wind blew
our phantom voices from rafters to thresholds.

Contra Dancing, Margot Carpenter for Alex Mann

ASTERISM ASTERISK

Remember       when you could draw       Ursa Major

     from memory?       How you knew to dip       from line

to endpoint      to line to endpoint?      Ursa Minor      was the same

     across       the        sky,       and Orion was a three-prong belt.      Maybe

this was in third grade      when string cheese was in lunch boxes

     and string theory       on TV.       When space shuttles taught you

the word tragedy      and you hoped      your teachers would never

     fly          away.       Something about outlining the stars—     

forming constellations by connecting       the dots, something

     about endpoints—      seemed necessary,      like a new language

you could use      in a future       where everyone soared       in cars.

     Something about mapping     those lines, and memorizing

the Latin,      and that joy          you got from asking,          “how is that a bear

     or an archer with a bow,      and what is a big dipper       anyway?”

Some things      are so easy       to forget once you learn      tragedy       by heart. 

Eastholm, Margot Carpenter for private collection

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Stephanie Wade teaches writing and environmental humanities at Unity College.  Her interest in maps and poems is part of a project to define narrative ecology, which posits narratives as living systems that include the stories conveyed by physical environments and material items; that shape our experiences and also respond to our actions; and that persist in layered, multiple, dynamic forms.

Michelle Menting is the author Myth of Solitude (Imaginary Friend Press, 2013) and Residence Time (Dancing Girl Press, 2016). Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Cimarron Review, The Offing, The Southeast Review, The Hopper, and the Deep Water and American Life in Poetry columns, among other places. She lives in mid-coast Maine.

Margot Carpenter creates digital and print maps for a diverse market. She has made maps for the Maine Department of Transportation; recreation, tourism and environmental groups; and for books published by Downeast Books, Dutton, Simon & Schuster, and Falcon Press. Her business Hartdale Maps is in Belfast, Maine.

Natural Phenomena: Thomas & Hines

Osprey of the Blue Refuge

I come over the dunes into morning light, white light, the kind of light that makes my tripod and 600-millimeter lens worth the weight.  I am hunting osprey.  For two weeks, I have walked the beaches of the bird refuge, sleeping in my car at the park campground.  I’ve found two nests.  One sits on a wooden platform beside the campground, its stick-and-sod lattice woven with denim thread and fishing line.  The other came down from its nest tree after the last hard rain.  I stood right there.  I watched it fall.
Early this morning, I went to the visitor’s center to ask after ospreys.  I shook hands with the ranger, whose name I could not recall.  He knew mine.  He stood up behind his desk when I came through the door.  “If it isn’t John Cossman,” he said.  He waited for his name.  The visitor’s center is not air-conditioned, so he sweat.  I sweat.  Since I could not ask his name, I asked for a map of the island.
He was wearing a park ranger’s Stetson.  If he’d taken off the Stetson, I might have known him.  I knew we’d gone to school together, to the only island school.  I knew he was one

 who never managed to get away.  Growing up on Santa Rosa Island, you hear it from your parents and your teachers and Mrs. Lewis at the grocery: “If you want to make something of yourself, you’ve got to get off the island.”   At seventeen, I did.  Four years later, when my choices were Southeast Asia or medical school, I chose medical school.
He asked what work I’d been doing, and I told him I was working as a pathologist in Charleston.  I did not tell him fifteen months ago, I diagnosed a cyst from the left breast of a woman—we’ll call her Ms. Lydia Harris—as a radial scar, benign.  It was malignant.  One year later, they diagnosed tubular carcinoma, stage three, metastatic in five of seventeen lymph nodes.  You can’t know what might have been, but her prognosis now is nine months of hell and then fifty-fifty.  They printed an interview with her in the local paper, covering the malpractice suit.  She said, “I just want him to admit he made a mistake.”  But a man doesn’t make a mistake like that.  I have diagnosed tubular carcinoma more times than I can count and never gotten it wrong before.



I told him I’d retired.
He said, “Good for you.”  He said he’d seen my father a few weeks ago at the food mart.  My father lives waterfront on the island’s eastern shore.  “Said he was thinking of selling the house, heading north.”
I shook my head.  My father built that house fifty years ago.  My wife Sandra has been trying to get him to sell and move up to Charleston, closer to us.  She thinks he’s lonely.  I tell her he likes his space, same as I do.  I said, “We’ll have to pry him out of that house.”
“Lots of people are selling,” he said.  “Going inland for work.  I’ve had every fisherman on the island come through this office in the past three months.  They stand just like you’re standing, asking have I got work for them.”
“I’m not looking for work,” I said.
He said, “I tell them like I’m telling you now.  I tell them if I had work don’t you think I’d give it to you?  In a minute, I’d give it to you.”
“I’m not looking for work.”
He rolled his chair back from the desk, tipped his hat up on his head.
I nearly had his name when Charleston called.  I let my phone ring itself out against my hip.  It was the lawyer, wanting to confirm tomorrow’s meeting.  In the message, she said, “Eight in the morning, doctor.”  She said, “See you then.”  We are to meet before the deposition.  The deposition is tomorrow. The deposition is at noon.  I could have left 

 

then, poured a small coffee to go and taken I-10 into the sun.  I could have been home in time to eat dinner with Sandra.  But I had remembered his name.  I leaned across the ranger’s desk, tapped two fingers down on the laminate.  “Russell,” I said, “I am looking for osprey.”

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I walk east, skirting the loose sand of the dunes, because Russell pointed me east.  He said there is a nest this way.  “Keep to the shore.  You can’t miss it.”  I keep to the shore.


From the air, Santa Rosa Island looks like a body afloat on the tide, the bridge a single arm stretched overhead, fingers sunk deep into the Florida coast.  The migratory bird refuge runs along the island’s southernmost point, three miles of undeveloped shoreline.  I am glad to be here, herding sandpipers up a lip of shore, dodging the stranded jellyfish that shine like blisters. Tar balls pebble the beach.  I kneel at intervals, steady my camera on my knee and try to photograph the hurried sandpipers, but the sun is too high.  Even underexposed, the sand behind them is too white.

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Sandra calls.  I feel her humming against my hip.  I take the phone and hold it in my palm.  She will want to know what time she should expect me home, to know if I hit traffic in Mobile, construction outside of Atlanta.  “Where are you?”she asks in the message. She asks twice.  If I called her back, I would tell her, “I’m leaving now,” and she would say, “I’ll wait up for you,” and she would wait and wait.
Last time I talked to Sandra, she told me they could take our savings if malpractice didn’t cover the suit.  They could take the Roth where we’ve been putting money every month for retirement.  They could take the house.  She said, “I’d hate to lose the house.”
Ospreys orient home by the sun on their biannual migrations.  They come to this island from Cuba, following a trail of floating rigs, whose derricks offer places to perch, to rest their wings or lock talons and sleep.  At night, when there is no sun, they fly by the stars—not single stars, star patterns, constellations.  If clouds obscure the stars, they follow the grid of ultraviolet light.  If they are blinded in the name of science, they use magnetic cues to find their way.
I haven’t slept in the house in Charleston in weeks.  I wouldn’t mind if they took it.  I could stay here, sell prints of my photographs, maybe work as a docent in the visitor’s center, make enough to keep myself in boots and canned peas.  I’d enjoy that sort of work, put-your-feet-up work, work that doesn’t help anything, doesn’t hurt anything.  When I get back to Charleston, I’ll tell them take the house.  I’ll tell them take it all.


At the fishing pier, a male osprey flies reconnaissance over the water, flexing his wings as though he might dive.  I pause, focus the osprey in the viewfinder of my camera.  I only have one photo of an osprey diving, and that one was an accident.  I’d brought my daughter Lacy down to see her grandfather and was taking pictures of her out in the surf.  She was maybe seven.  In one picture, right in the corner, I caught an osprey with his wings tucked, tipped down toward the water.  Lacy is just beside the bird, with her skirt bunched at her waist and one hand skimming the surf.  In the print it looks as though the osprey is coming to land on her shoulder, tame as a hunting hawk.  Lacy’s studying now in Virginia, studying biology, planning on medical school.  I’ve told her there are worse ways she could go.
On the fishing pier, a man works a cast net, his cooler open and empty at his feet.  His hands spider across the webbing—limber hands, young hands.  My hands are stiff.  About a year ago, I started having trouble grasping the fine-focus knob on my microscope.  I took to working just with the coarse focus, playing it out and back until the tissue came clear.  And I have thought about that.  I’ve thought if the image was sharper maybe I would have caught it, would have seen the slight pinching of adipose tissue stained orange, a rusted carcinoma.
Behind the net fisherman, a blue heron skulks, hoping for a handout.  Last summer, the pier would have been packed shoulder to shoulder, families sleeping at night in lawn chairs to keep their spot, farming their narrow patch of ocean.  That was before the spill, before word came from the trawlers of eyeless shrimp, crabs without claws, two-headed fish, fish covered in boils, in black lesions, fish that bled black at the hook and were black inside, gills and muscle and bone, like they’d been charred.

Strung along the pier’s railing are animal bones, threaded on fishing line with pop tabs and shells as spacers—the bones of fish washed up on shore, of birds and turtles found dead on the beaches in the months after the spill.  I walk past a large pelvis, a pelican’s perhaps, and a skull that looks distinctly canine.  Someone has added a Marlins cap and a strand of holiday tinsel.  At the end of the pier, a sign reads “Make Them Pay.”  The oil company has paid.  If I look to my left, I will see the cranes and backhoes, quiet for the weekend, which have started construction on a twenty-five-story hotel made possible by the county’s claim check.

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Santa Rosa Island was spared the worst of the slick.  Off the Louisiana coast, it is said the oil sludge was so thick you could walk between barrier islands without sinking into the water. They burned what oil they could off the surface.  


Families gathered on Louisiana beaches to watch the lighting of the Gulf.
On the shore beside the pier, a man wearing headphones plays a free line in shallow water, catch and release.   He hasn’t bothered bringing a cooler.
My osprey has ceased his arcs and settled on a branch overlooking the waves.

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“What are you after?” I ask the man with the free line.  He pulls his headphones down from his ears, and I repeat my question.
He says, “Anything that’ll bite.”

We get to talking.  He’s headed through to south Florida, comes down every year about this time and stays until spring.  “For the warmth.”  He asks about my camera, asks if I’m shooting for a magazine, and I shake my head.
“Retired,” I say.
“These things happen, John,” Gary said after the summons. Gary and I shared an office.  We shared cases, the head-scratchers, passing them back and forth until we came to a consensus.  The day I misdiagnosed Lydia Harris he wasn’t in the office.  His son was pitching a little league game, and he had gone to watch.
“You’re a good doctor, John,” he said.  I stood looking at my microscope in its heavy dust cover, at the slide trays stacked ten-high on the desk beside it.  “You think you could take them for me, Gary?” I asked him.  “Just for today?”
He had a stack of his own, but he took them.  They asked me to resign the next day.
I tell the fisherman, “I’m living like I should have been all my life.”
He tells me he’s retired as well.  He was a conductor, he says.  “The Cincinnati Orchestra.”
The osprey leaves his perch, and I raise my camera.  I watch him fly.  “You miss it?” I ask him.
He shakes his head.  “It’s the nerves,” he says.  “You get so a body just can’t take it anymore.”
The osprey shades the water with his wings, searching the shadows for the flash of a darting fish.  At that shine, he will hover, positioning, then plummet feet first, extending his head at the last moment so beak and talons enter the water together.  He will miss just one catch in fifty.


The net fisherman has brought up three small herring and lowers them carefully into his ice chest.  I lift my camera.  I take one photo—the ice chest, man, and heron all in a single frame.  The light is heavy, iron light.
I tell the conductor I’ve been photographing ospreys.  “Keeps me occupied,” I say.  He can understand that.  He’s fishing just to toss the fish back.  “Only found two nests so far,” I say.  I tell him there’s some who blame the oil for that, say it’s made for bad fishing, say the ospreys are staying away.  “Somebody cut corners,” I say.
He shrugs.  He says, “Somebody wasn’t paying attention.  That’s my guess.”
I shake my head.  I’ve thought about it, of course, thought I might have been distracted.  I’ve thought maybe the Saturday Gary’s son pitched his first game was the Saturday Sandra told me she was going to visit her sister for a few weeks, maybe a month, said she needed some time away.  “I’ll come with you,” I said.  She said, “You’ve got work.”  I told her I’m ready, anyway, to be retired.  “Work three more years for me, John,” she said.  “Just until we pay off the house.”  I told her she knows, doesn’t she, that I need her here.  She said she knew.  But it can’t have been that Saturday.  That Saturday I didn’t go into the office.  I stayed at home with her.
“Grossly negligent,” I say.  That is the phrase the courts will use.  I say, “They knew what they were doing.”
The  conductor has caught a fish.  He wades out into the water to take it by the tail, gets it unhooked and tosses it up to the heron on the pier.  It is a fifteen-inch sea trout, one-headed.  The heron does not, of course, want it.  Too hard to get down and keep down.

The  fish flaps against the pier, tugging for water, jumping like the ground beneath him is hot enough for cooking.
The  net fisherman comes away from his net to stand over the fish.  “That’s a catch,” he says to the conductor.

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The conductor shrugs.  “Been at it a few hours.  About time.”
The  fisherman nudges the sea trout with one toe. “You see the herring out there?” he asks us, pointing over the water.  “I bet this one was after the herring.”


I look where he points, and I see them, flashes of silver, fish flying from fish.
He says, “Man tried yesterday to charge me three bucks a pound for skipjack.  Three bucks a pound, and the fish so thick out there you could shovel them up.”

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The  conductor says, “I’ve never heard herring to leap like that.”
“Any fish’ll jump if he’s got cause.”
My osprey hovers above the school.  I lift my camera.  I catch him with kinked wings.

“You got a boat as nice as that camera?” the net fisherman asks me.
I shake my head.
“I’m in the market,” he says. “They took my seiner to Luling to help with the clean up.  Might as well take my legs, I told them, but they just needed the seiner.”
“I don’t have a boat,” I say.
I’d lease her from you if you didn’t want to sell,” he says.  “Schools like that I’d turn a profit quick.”  He tugs at the brim of his ball cap.  He is looking down at the trout, which has more meat on it than six herring.  “You just going to leave it?”
“I was meaning the bird to eat him,” the conductor says.
“Bird doesn’t look interested to me.”
The conductor shrugs and pulls at the cord of his headphones, which dangles, cut, at his navel.
The net fisherman stoops and takes the trout by the jaw.  “You don’t want him.”
The conductor says, “I wouldn’t eat anything out of the Gulf.”
The net fisherman lowers the trout into his ice chest and starts packing away his net. He says, “What else is there to eat?”  He lifts his cooler onto his shoulder and makes his slow way down the beach.  He stops once to rest, and I point my camera at his back, but the sun is out in front of him, shining directly into the lens.  He is just a shadow, the world brightened to rainbow around him like oil sheen on water.
I turn back at a splash.  The osprey is coming up out of the Gulf, shaking the water free of his feathers and gaining altitude.  He is not carrying a fish, not carrying anything at all.


It is almost noon.  I have followed the call of a female osprey into brush so thick I cannot see the Gulf.  I did not think to bring a machete, so I swing with my tripod, with my arms.  My camera I do not swing, but tuck safely beneath my shirt.  The map, I have decided, as I fold and unfold it and turn it in my hands, is useless.  It does not show, for instance, the copse of pines shading my bare head from the advancing sun, nor the prickly pear which has just, obligingly, inserted a slender needle through the sole of my right boot into my largest toe.  And the marsh visible beyond the acacia could be any of three marshes.
I tighten the belt of my jeans and wade into that marsh.  The water is black and warm, folding around me.  I come up onto dry land soaked and blooded and feeling altogether good, because a female osprey is perched on a branch just two yards ahead of me, and my eye is level with her lizard eye.  She sees past me, past all the heavy-browed hominids right back to Homo erectus egg-snatcher.  She knows better than to trust me.
I wander the sand pines, searching for her nest.  Last week, I watched a nest fall from a sand pine in a grove like this.  It was an old nest, a decade old or older—four feet in diameter, two hundred pounds at least, enough seaweed and grass to start a slow process of decomposition, generating heat for the nestlings.  There were two nestlings.  When the nest fell, I was squinting through my viewfinder at their snaking heads.
The fall was quiet, marked only by the whistled two-note alarm call of the female osprey hovering above the newly barren tree.  I left my camera and crawled into the thicket of sweet acacia surrounding the trunk of the nest tree.  I spent forty minutes working on hands and knees, searching for the fallen nest.  I found it on its side—sticks and seaweed, down feathers, a scrap of denim.

The nestlings were alive, black-skinned and scaly, reminiscent of their reptilian ancestors.  They pulsed with their rapid, whole-body breathing, hissed, flicked their narrow tongues.  I took a few pictures, and that’s all I did.  I shot them

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zoomed in tight with the aperture wide open.  I caught with my camera the vein of each pinfeather, the bristled legs of the bluebottle flies that swarmed the nest.  In the pictures, the background is blurred.  In the pictures those nestlings might be twenty yards up in the air.
I wander until I lose the light.  I do not find a nest, but I know it is close, because twice the female osprey flies a tight circle over my head.  I lift my len
s to shoot her agitated. 


She wheels with spread wings, sounds her alarm to the standing pines.  I play the manual focus out and back until she is so sharp through the lens I can count the ruffled feathers of her necklace, which mottle her white breast.

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I walk back to the campground along the narrow seawall surrounding the old naval fort.  As a boy, I rode my motorbike along this seawall, picking up speed and lifting the bike onto its rear wheel. In those days, colonies of plovers nested on the island, thousands of them, stretched for a half-mile

 

along the shoreline and packed so tightly you couldn’t pick your way through without putting one foot down in a nest.  You could walk right up to a brooding plover, take her from the nest with one hand and wring her neck, easy as collecting shells.  We used to cook and eat them when the weather kept us from fishing.
One night I took my motorbike down onto the beach and through the center of the nesting colony, plovers blowing up before the front tire like scraps of shredded paper. I came away from the colony scratched and splattered with urea.  My father, when he heard, was furious.  In part, because the bike’s sprocket and chain had to be replaced, but mostly because I had proven myself capable of malice he had not expected.
After that night, I could not get within fifty yards of the colony without being mobbed by a dozen birds, sprayed with excrement.  Every year it was the same.  Even when I returned after eight years away, the birds remembered me.  The plovers are protected now, the shells of their eggs so thin they shatter at a touch.  They don’t nest on this island anymore.
Sandra calls.  I answer.  I don’t want her thinking something happened to me on the road.  I don’t want her worrying.
She says, “John.”
I ask her if she thinks I made the misdiagnosis on purpose.
She says, “No.”  She says, “Where are you?”
I say, “What other explanation is there?”
She says, “Have you left yet?”  She says, “It was a mistake, John.  They know it was a mistake.”

 


I tell her I haven’t left yet.  I tell her I don’t know when I’m leaving.
“You can’t miss the deposition.  It’s against the law to miss the deposition.”
I say to her, “I know.”
“No one thinks you’re a criminal, John.”
I say, “I knew what I was doing,” thinking not about the Saturday I misdiagnosed Lydia Harris, but about all the other Saturdays, the Saturdays I remember.  The Saturday Lacy broke her wrist playing softball, and I signed out two frozen sections before meeting Sandra at the emergency room.  The Saturday Sandra’s mother passed, and we stopped at the office on our way to the airport, so I could sign out a lymph node biopsy—sarcoidosis, benign.  The Saturdays I bickered with Sandra over cold cereal and came to the office head-pounding.  I imagine the day I misdiagnosed Lydia Harris was a Saturday like any other Saturday.  I woke in the morning and left Sandra sleeping.  I made a pot of coffee, put Sandra’s mug in the microwave, so it would be ready to heat when she woke.  I drove twenty minutes to the office and parked in the lot reserved for doctors.  The office was quiet, as it always is on Saturdays.  It’s one of the reasons I like working Saturdays, you get the place to yourself.  I took my time over the frozen, just the single frozen, and finished the handful of cases left from the week before.  I returned home for dinner, and when Sandra asked how was it, I told her, “A good day.”  I told her, “One frozen, benign.”  I told her, “She got lucky.”

I call my father, because it is Sunday, because we eat dinner together on Sundays when I am on the island. He is free,

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he says, and so I pick him up from his house and take him toJoe’s, the only diner on the island that doesn’t serve seafood.  After dinner, I ask him if there is any place he needs to go, but he says Mrs. Parker took him into town that morning.  She takes him once a week for groceries and to refill his prescriptions.  On Saturday mornings, she takes him to the brunches Gulf Power puts on for their employees, past and present.  He wears his denim work-suit and the gold star he was given at retirement for putting in forty years.  He retired at seventy-two, though I suspect they kept him on, those last few years, just out of obligation.  He’s the only one at the brunches with a star.  The other attendees are all kids in their thirties.  Pole boys, he calls them.


I bring him to the refuge, driving slowly to miss the ghost crabs that scuttle across the beach road.  We stand on the path leading from the campground to the water catchment tanks.  We have a clear view of the turnip nest, so named for its shape and the patch of turnips growing feral in front of   

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it. There are three chicks in the turnip nest.  I steady my camera on its tripod, the viewfinder centered on them, just in case.

My father hasn’t been in the refuge since I came down with Lacy three years ago.  On that day he had to double the strings of his swimsuit around his waist to keep it from slipping down.  It was a green flag day, a calm day.  We went out into the waves, the three of us.  Lacy grinned every time I looked at her.  She was seventeen and already keeping her distance, but I like to think she enjoyed herself that day.  Dad lost his footing in the surf once, ended up tipped backward, working his arms in the water, head dipping under and surfacing again, spluttering.
I didn’t move.  It’s not something you expect to see, the man who striped your thighs with a Sam Browne belt panicked like a beetle on his back, swallowing water.  Lacy was the one who pulled him to his feet, and after she stayed close right beside him.  She put one arm around his waist, taking his weight, struggling with him up out of the water and into the dune fields.  I came behind them, watching her, thinking she was going to be all right, Lacy, thinking kids mostly raise themselves, wondering at how easily she loved him.
I asked him this evening if he wanted to go out into the surf, but he said he’d rather not, so we are watching birds.  The female is on the nest.  If we watch long enough, I say, we’ll see the male fly in with a fish.  He’ll have eaten what he can of the head and torn the rest away to lessen the weight.
He says, “I talked to Sandra this morning.  She seemed to think you were heading home.”
I say, “She doesn’t need to worry about me.”
“When are you heading home?”
I tell him I don’t know.


He says, “You’re a smart man, Dr. Cossman, and you’re throwing that away.”  He doesn’t approve of my early retirement.  He doesn’t know anything about Ms. Lydia Harris, who is right now walking through her house to her children’s bedroom, walking as though through sand, heavily.  She rubs at her neck, her shoulder, tired and aching in her limbs and right to blame me.
I bend again to my camera, focus it on the silhouette of an osprey on the near shore.  It might be the female from the nest that fell.  I can’t be sure. She is perched high over the waves, scanning for fish.  I wonder if she has abandoned the nestlings, and if some part of her is relieved to have finally failed, glad to have the evening to fish just for herself.
We wait another thirty minutes, though there’s no point.  The nest is quiet, and the light is low, western light, rusted light.  He is impatient, and so I drive him home in my car, which he does not like, crowded as it is with dirty clothes and an unrolled sleeping bag, canned food, camera equipment.
“Is there a restroom,” he asks me, “at the campground?”
We’re past the campground.  “I can go back,” I say, but I do not turn around.
He says, “I’ll be fine.”
He wets himself three minutes from his house.  I look over when I smell the ammonia, but he is backlit by the window, and I can’t see his face.  When I pull up into the drive, he says, “You go on in.”
He comes in a few minutes after me, says, “I’ve got sheets put on your bed.”  Says, “You sleep here tonight, and in the morning we’ll take your car to the wash to get the sand off of her.  You’ll ruin her with that sand.”

I wait until he is in his bedroom, running water for a shower, then I take a towel and a bottle of stain remover from the laundry closet.  He has tried drying the seat with a wad of Kleenex.  Bits of the Kleenex are stuck now to the upholstery.  I towel it dry, soak it with stain remover and towel it again.  I leave the windows open.

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 We sit together in the breakfast room where I once fixed up an old Nikon rangefinder.  I shot two rolls of film with that camera, developed them at this table, in a darkroom I made by draping black canvas over a hat stand.


I stay long enough to share a pot of coffee.  He cuts coupons from the Sunday paper.  “I’m selling the house,” he says.  He looks at me over the paper.
I say, “This house?”  He built this house after we moved down from Virginia.  He was happy in those early years, living on a 34-foot sloop, trucking lumber over from the mainland.  I was happy.
“You don’t want the house,” he says, “and I’m getting too old to live like this.”
I say no to the first, no to the second.  I say, “You’re doing fine.”
He works his scissors around an advertisement for turkey sausage.  His hand shakes.
“If you want a smaller place,” I say, “I can find you a smaller place.”
“I thought I’d go with you to Charleston.  When you go.”
“I don’t know when I’m going.”
He nods.  “When you do.”
“We don’t have the space,” I say, “in Charleston.”
“All I need’s a place to sleep,” he says, but his house is full of things, and our house is full of things, and we might not have the house.
I say, “You built this place.”
He says, “I had a son to raise and no place to raise him.”  He says, “No one would build it for me.”
I drink my coffee.
He says, “I watched them bury Lutt Parker in sand so shallow next storm he’ll be above ground again.  You hit an age you start thinking practically about these things.”
“There’s time and time,” I say, “to figure all that out.”

“Virginia’s solid ground.  I wouldn’t mind Virginia.”
“You came to this island.  You left Virginia.”
“I came to this island to raise a boy up.  And I did that.”  He raps his finger down on coupons offering fifty cents off Selma’s Blueberry Spread or two stone-baked pizzas for the price of one.  “Island like this, you want to be just passing through.”
The visitor’s center at the refuge is closed.  I walk past it, east into the pine forest, toward the place where the nest fell.  I pass a park ranger headed the other way.  “You can’t sleep out here,” she says.  “You have to stay in the designated camping grounds.”
I tell her I’m just walking.
She wants to know if I have a camping permit, and when I tell her it’s in my car, she wants to walk with me back to my car.   We walk together.  She stays behind me, as though given half a chance I would turn and bolt.  She says, “There’s no camping in the park without a permit.”
It takes me ten minutes to find the permit. While I’m looking, she bends the brim of her hat in her hands.  It is the traditional park service hat, the Smokey Bear hat, the lemon squeezer.
I hand her the permit.  She looks it over.
“I haven’t broken any rules,” I tell her.
She hands it back.  She says, “Have a good night, Mr. Cossman,” and I do not correct her.
“At the campground, the conductor has built a fire using two-by-fours as fuel.  When he lifts a hand to me, I go to sit beside his fire, though the sun has just set, and it is still eighty degrees at least.  We sit in silence. I pinch the sand flies that


land on my arms and drop them into the fire. At intervals, he hums a few measures of nothing familiar, and when he realizes he’s doing it he glances over at me, grins, embarrassed, and slaps his left hand with his right, as though in reprimand.
There is nothing at his campsite but an army-issue tent and the chair he is sitting in now.  “Where are your things?” I ask him.  “Your car?”
“Sold the car,” he says.  “Ten years ago, it was.”
“How’d you get down here?”
“I had a buddy coming as far as Atlanta.  I got down all right.”  He kneads his hip with one hand.
“It’s the wet,” I say, because my knees have been aching and slow to bend.
He shakes his head.  He tells me he shattered the joint years ago.  He fell off the podium halfway through Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony.  “Ten feet.  Down into the orchestra pit.”  He tells me they don’t list his name with the other conductors for the Cincinnati Orchestra.  Every other name, but not his.  “Nine months I waved a baton for them, and they can’t be bothered to remember my name.”
“I ask him what is his name.  Daniel Hartzog, he tells me, and I say it back to him to be sure I’ve got it right.
“What about you,” he says.  “Think they’ll remember you?”
“I say, “Yes.  I do.”
“Well then,” he says.  “That’s something.”
The other campers come from their air-conditioned fifth wheels and Winnebagos to join us.  They would stay in the cool if they could, but the conductor has built a good fire, and so they come with folding chairs and children and easy
talk.  The conductor is quiet.  A fly has landed on his cheek, just beneath his right eye, and he does not lift a hand to brush it off.  But when a man takes a guitar from a black leather 

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case and starts to strum, he puts on his headphones.  He leans over and tells me to have a good sleep.  He stands, offers his seat to a woman standing behind it, and ducks into his tent.


I leave soon after, because someone puts a piece of driftwood on the fire, and it burns with a smoke thick and black as tar, smelling of diesel.  I walk to my car.  If I left right now, I’d arrive in Charleston by nine in the morning, late but not too late.  In Charleston, Sandra is lying awake in our bed, not expecting me.  Ms. Lydia Harris sits in an empty
bathtub, fully clothed, nauseated.  Her eyes are shut.  The tub rocks beneath her, and she waits, waits for the rocking to cease, for the tide to pull back and leave her steady on the shore.  In Charleston, they have photographed the slide of adipose tissue using a lens dipped in cold immersion oil.  There is nothing in those photos I haven’t seen before.

 

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Award winning artist and storyteller, Jessica Hines, uses the camera’s inherent quality as a recording device to explore illusion and to suggest truths that underlie the visible world. At the core of Hines’ work lies an inquisitive nature inspired by personal memory, experience and the unconscious mind.

Morgan Thomas graduated with an MFA in fiction writing from the University of Oregon.  She is currently a Fulbright student, teaching English and creative writing in Darkhan, Mongolia.

Stanizzi & Marble: Listening

flying_birds_2

John L. Stanizzi Anne Marble       


Skein

a length of yarn or thread wound on a reel or swift
nest of yarn on Zia Rose’s lap
beaks of knitting needles
pecking mittens into being

*
ice and wool
in murky chunks
inedible on mittens

*
mittens on the radiator
sun a hank of fire
on the horizon

*
the swifts are gone
but the blackbirds
murmur by the thousands

a succession or series of similar or interrelated things such as an incoherent skein of words
wounds healed
by the long stand of years
the theology of the sun

*
golden gratefulness
eruptions of wind
flowers bowing in the storm

*
listening to flesh
you draw closer
glisten with urgency


*
you leave
past the moon
swift with borrowed light
a flock of geese, ducks, or the like, in flight
low over Mansfield
coming together from three directions
three skeins of geese

*
the Chinese poets
might say they conduct a message
of love from afar

*
their boundless sound
the white flecks of their bellies
thrusting air up and down

*
your swift breathing
is the air
that reels me in


A Sign; acrylic on canvas; 30 in. x 40 in. © Anne Marble

Lungs; paper, ink, acrylic paint, glue on board; 24 in. x 30 in. © Anne Marble


LISTEN

for Cathy O’Reilly

On a clear, warm summer day
Cathy handed me a prize
she’d received from the surf.
It was a vertebra,
from a fish I imagine,
about the size of the top of my thumb,
and so smooth,
so rounded by the sea,
it felt soft.
I was holding it this morning,
rubbing the tips of my fingers
all over its unlikely velvetiness,
when I noticed that if I held it
so that I could look through
the hole in its middle
it looked like a resplendent ear,
this one small piece
of something from the sea,
something larger,
more complex,
and now on dry land,
a separate entity,
a curio given by the ocean to Cathy
and by Cathy to me,
so that now when I’m alone in this room
I no longer worry
that when I speak into the nothingness of frustration
my words will go unheard

The Messenger; acrylic on canvas 30 in. x 40 in. © Anne Marble



 

Magic Inside; acrylic on canvas 30 in. x 40 in. © Anne Marble

Magic Inside; acrylic on canvas 30 in. x 40 in. © Anne Marble

SKEIN II

I was on my way into the gym and
heard the geese blaring before I saw them,
a skein from the west, the V visible
but ragtag. I was looking up now, and
from the east a second skein was coming,
their raucous clamor growing as they rammed
the first V, though “rammed” may not be the best
way to describe what I saw; it was more
like the calibration of clockworks, each
bird part of a pinion meshing with the
larger wheel, a gear-train powering south.

As one bird pulled in behind the other,
their heart rates slowed but their speed increased as
they slipstreamed across the January
sky; and then a third skein came barreling
in from the north, the third wheel in this huge
going-train, urging and gliding, every
goose baying a one note song millions of
years old; and below their riotous noise

the V appeared with the kind of wonder
that becomes visible only after
it has happened. And I was left standing,
my senses staggered, my spirit increased,
as in the distance their yawping became
quiet, their instinct, their impulse for south
moving them along, me waiting for spring,
the geese gone, their perfect escapement done.


Chains; monotype print; 22 in. x 30 in. © Anne Marble

Chains; monotype print; 22 in. x 30 in. © Anne Marble

John L. Stanizziauthor of Ecstasy Among Ghosts, Sleepwalking, Dance Against the Wall, After the Bell, and Hallelujah Time!  His poems have appeared in American Life In Poetry, Prairie Schooner, Tar River Poetry, The New York Quarterly, Rattle, and others.  He teaches literature at Manchester Community College. 

Anne Marble is a painter and monotype printmaker who lives in the Philadelphia area.  Her background in biology and environmental planning often serves as a reference for her work in both media. She is also the founder of a non-profit organization supporting several rural schools in Cambodia.  On her visits to Cambodia, she teaches printmaking to middle school students.  She maintains an active studio in Norristown,
Pennsylvania.  

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